The Extant Works of Aretaeus, The Cappadocian.

The Extant Works of Aretaeus, The Cappadocian.
By Aretaeus
Edited by: Francis Adams LL.D. (trans.)

Boston Milford House Inc. 1972 (Republication of the 1856 edition).


Digital Hippocrates Collection Table of Contents



OF ARETÆUS, THE CAPPADOCIAN. CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS OF ACUTE DISEASE
   BOOK I.

OF ARETÆUS, THE CAPPADOCIAN, ON THE CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS OF ACUTE DISEASE
   BOOK II.

OF ARETÆUS, THE CAPPADOCIAN, ON THE CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS OF CHRONIC DISEASE
   BOOK I.


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OF ARETÆUS, THE CAPPADOCIAN, ON THE CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS OF CHRONIC DISEASE

BOOK I.

CHAPTER IX.

 [p. 348]

nay, the very remembrance of them is attended with nausea, distress, water-brash, and heart-ache; and in certain cases there is salivation and vomiting. Even when the body wastes, provided their stomach remain empty, they bear this pain more easily than that produced by the administration of food. But if at any time they are compelled by necessity to take food, the pain is worse than hunger; the act of masticating in the mouth occasions sufferance, and to drink is a still greater pain. And it is not that they suffer thus from suitable food, and bear more unusual food well; owing to a change from that which is natural to the opposite, there is a painful sensation as to everything, an aversion to, and dislike of, all kinds of food. Along with these there is pain between the scapulæ, much greater after the administration of food or drink; loathing, distress, sight dull, noises of the ears, heaviness of the head, torpidity of the limbs, their joints sink under them; palpitation in the hypochondriac region; phantasy, as of the spine being moved towards the lower limbs; they seem as if carried about, now this way and now that, whether they stand, or lie down, like reeds or trees shaken by a gale of wind; they belch out a cold and watery phlegm. But if there be bile in bilious persons, they have dimness of sight, and no thirst, even when owing to the food they appear thirsty; are sleepless, torpid, drowsy, not from true sleep, but like those in comatose affections; emaciated, very pale, feeble, relaxed, imbecile, dispirited, timid, inactive, quick to passion, very moody; for such persons at times have fallen into a state of melancholy.

These mental emotions necessarily attend the affection when in connection with the stomach; but certain people, recognising the parts which sympathise, and from which the most dreadful symptoms arise, reckon the stomach as the cause. But the contiguity of the heart, which is of all organs the first, is a strong confirmation of the truth of what I say; for