Hippocrates Collected Works I


Hippocrates Collected Works I




Digital Hippocrates Collection Table of Contents



PREFACE

GENERAL INTRODUCTION
  1. Greek Medicine and Hippocrates
  2. The Hippocratic Collection
  3. Means of Dating Hippocratic Works
  4. Plato's References to Hippocrates
  5. THE COMMENTATORS AND OTHER ANCIENT AUTHORITIES.
  Galen
  6. LIFE OF HIPPOCRATES.
  7. THE ASCLEPIADAE.
  8. THE DOCTRINE OF HUMOURS.
  9. CHIEF DISEASES MENTIONED IN THE HIPPOCRATIC COLLECTION.
  10. POLU/S AND O)LI/GOS IN THE PLURAL.
  11. THE IONIC DIALECT OF THE HIPPOCRATIC COLLECTION.
  12. MANUSCRIPTS.

ANCIENT MEDICINE
  INTRODUCTION
  ANCIENT MEDICINE
  APPENDIX

AIRS WATERS PLACES
  INTRODUCTION
  MSS. AND EDITIONS.
  AIRS WATERS PLACES

EPIDEMICS I AND III
  INTRODUCTION
  EPIDEMICS I
  EPIDEMICS III: THE CHARACTERS
  EPIDEMICS III
  SIXTEEN CASES

THE OATH
  Introduction
  OATH

PRECEPTS
  INTRODUCTION
  PRECEPTS

NUTRIMENT
  INTRODUCTION
  NUTRIMENT


This electronic edition is funded by the National Library of Medicine History of Medicine Division. This text has been proofread to a low degree of accuracy. It was converted to electronic form using Data Entry.

PRECEPTS

INTRODUCTION

   

early authorship, we need conclude no more than that Chrysippus knew the originals from which the compilation was made--indeed he must have been well acquainted with the Epicurean original of Chapters I and II. There is nothing in the evidence to prevent our taking Precepts to be a cento from good sources made by a late writer not perfectly familiar with Greek. Somehow it became incorporated in a collection of Hippocratic writings, probably a little-known one, as none of the ancient " lists " of Hippocratic works includes Precepts. There was no generally accepted canon, and a work of unknown or uncertain authorship might easily find its way into the Hippocratic collection in one or other of the great libraries.

Although linguistic difficulties obscure the details, the reader will be interested in the picture of medical practice in antiquity. The " late-learner " covering up his mistakes in a flood of medical jargon will suggest the doctors of Moliére. The public lectures, with quotations from poetry, are the exact counterpart of modern advertisements of patent medicines.

MSS. AND EDITIONS.

Precepts is found in several of the Paris manuscripts and in M.
There is no good apparatus criticus. I have tried to infer from Littré's " vulgate " and Ermerins' text what is the reading of the majority of the manuscripts, and it is generally this reading which I denote by " MSS." Only more careful examination of the actual manuscripts can show how far I am justified in so doing.
There have been so far as I know no separate editions and no translations into English.


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