Hippocrates Collected Works I


Hippocrates Collected Works I




Digital Hippocrates Collection Table of Contents



PREFACE

GENERAL INTRODUCTION
  1. Greek Medicine and Hippocrates
  2. The Hippocratic Collection
  3. Means of Dating Hippocratic Works
  4. Plato's References to Hippocrates
  5. THE COMMENTATORS AND OTHER ANCIENT AUTHORITIES.
  Galen
  6. LIFE OF HIPPOCRATES.
  7. THE ASCLEPIADAE.
  8. THE DOCTRINE OF HUMOURS.
  9. CHIEF DISEASES MENTIONED IN THE HIPPOCRATIC COLLECTION.
  10. POLU/S AND O)LI/GOS IN THE PLURAL.
  11. THE IONIC DIALECT OF THE HIPPOCRATIC COLLECTION.
  12. MANUSCRIPTS.

ANCIENT MEDICINE
  INTRODUCTION
  ANCIENT MEDICINE
  APPENDIX

AIRS WATERS PLACES
  INTRODUCTION
  MSS. AND EDITIONS.
  AIRS WATERS PLACES

EPIDEMICS I AND III
  INTRODUCTION
  EPIDEMICS I
  EPIDEMICS III: THE CHARACTERS
  EPIDEMICS III
  SIXTEEN CASES

THE OATH
  Introduction
  OATH

PRECEPTS
  INTRODUCTION
  PRECEPTS

NUTRIMENT
  INTRODUCTION
  NUTRIMENT


This electronic edition is funded by the National Library of Medicine History of Medicine Division. This text has been proofread to a low degree of accuracy. It was converted to electronic form using Data Entry.

PRECEPTS

INTRODUCTION

   

from accurately observed facts only, and upon the necessity of not worrying the patient about fees, and his pungent criticisms of quacks, their dupes, and all " late-learners."

There is something about the style which is reminiscent of Latin, particularly παραινέσιοσ2 τοῦτο in Chapter IV, meaning " this piece of advice," and perhaps the future in Chapter V with imperatival sense.
Since I wrote the above my attention has been called to στενῶν ἔνδος1ιν in Chapter VII. The word στενῶν looks like angustiarum.
The perfect tense too is commonly used for the aorist. One would be tempted to regard the author as a Roman who wrote in Greek an essay, compiled from Epicurean literature and fairly sound medical sources, were it not for two scholia, one discovered by Daremberg and the other in the MS. Vaticanus gr. 277. The latter quotes a great part of Erotian's explanation of φλεδονώδεα as a comment upon Precepts VII.,where our MSS. now have φθογγώδεα or φθεγγώδεα. In other words, the treatise appears to have been known to Erotian, or to the authorities used by Erotian, as an Hippocratic work. Daremberg
See Notices et extraits des manuscrits médicaux grecs, latins et franéais des principales bibliothéques de l'Europe, pp. 200-203.
discovered in a Vatican MS. a gloss from which it appears that Galen commented on Precepts, and that Archigenes (a physician of the early second century A.D.) and Chrysippus the Stoic commented on the distinction between καιρός2 and χρόνος2 with which Precepts opens.

Even if we allow full weight to this evidence of

 Image Size: 240x320 480x640 
960x1280 1440x1920 1920x2560